Biore cleans up with nose strips: Pore Perfect deep cleansing nose strips have become the top-selling facial care item in Canada

Montreal: Launched just last summer, Biore Pore Perfect deep cleansing nose strips have become the top-selling facial care item in Canada, according to AC Nielsen MarketTrack data for the 52-week period ending Jan. 31, 1997. The strips, which chemically bond to...

Montreal: Launched just last summer, Biore Pore Perfect deep cleansing nose strips have become the top-selling facial care item in Canada, according to AC Nielsen MarketTrack data for the 52-week period ending Jan. 31, 1997.

The strips, which chemically bond to and harden the blackhead-causing gunk that builds up inside nose pores, peel off to reveal dozens of tiny dirt-and-oil stalactites stuck to the strip, leaving pores clean in the process.

Biore’s Pore Perfect nose strips and complementary hydrating moisturizer, foaming cleanser and non-foaming cleansing gel, are being marketed specifically to women 18 to 34, a demographic Ted Arnold, Biore marketing director at Mississauga, Ont.-based Jergens Canada, deems underserved.

‘Most of the competitors focus on moisturizing for the bulk of their sales rather than cleansing,’ says Arnold. ‘Ours is really a cleansing focus.’

Arnold attributes the success of the Pore Perfect nose strips in large part to a massive program which the company says saw more than two million samples given away at events such as the Lilith Fair women’s concert tour, a five-city event where 100,000 samples were distributed.

Samples were also distributed in magazines such as Chatelaine (English and French versions), Modern Woman, and Quebec titles Les Ailes de la Mode, Clin d’Oeil and Elle Quebec.

The sampling program is being supported with regular magazine advertising.

Biore currently has the domestic nose strip market to itself, but stiff competition is expected from u.s., says Arnold. The Biore line is currently ranked third in the facial-care product category in Canada. Oil of Olay (Procter & Gamble), Pond’s (Lever Pond’s) and Plenitude (Cosmair) are among the other category leaders.

The Biore linewas first launched in Japan in 1996 by Jergens Canada’s ultimate owner, Kao of Tokyo.

According to ACNielsen, total drug-store, mass-merchandise and grocery-store sales of facial-care products in Canada last year were nearly $200 million, an increase of 10.7% over 1996. Biore contributed a remarkable 30.2% of that growth in a four-month period, the last four months of 1997.

About a third to 40% of all sales were for cleansers, with 60% or more for moisturizers.

Biore’s tv creative is from agency Deutsch, New York. Additional creative work is by Jacques Paris et Associes, Toronto, for French-language advertising, and Creative Art & Design, Toronto, for point-of-sale and brochures.