Lay’s launches a dating site

As part of a three-year campaign, the sandwich finally finds love thanks to some online help.

Pepsico’s Frito Lay brands have all taken to online dating en masse in the hopes of wooing your next sandwich.

For the third year of the brand’s multi-year, lunchtime love affair campaign, the Lay’s brand has brought on board other chips under the Pepsico banner in the hopes of making the tasty treat part of Canadians’ everyday lunch ritual.

Working with BBDO, the brand has launched the final in a series of TV romance videos. The first video, launched in 2012 focused on a lonely sandwich as it went through the motions of singledom (such as watching movies alone) and Lay’s, as its eventual soulmate, was only foreshadowed by a passing Lay’s truck cameo. The second, featured the sandwich daydreaming about the chip brand. In the third, the sandwich finally gets the girl chip.

In Canada, says Peter Ignazi, SVP/ECD, BBDO, people don’t consume chips with their meals as much as in other parts or the world. The entire campaign has been designed to encourage the pairing in a cheeky manner. Now, in its final year, the brand is rolling out its online dating service, designed to match your sandwich with the right chip.

Launched last week, Lunchmatch.ca features online profiles of various Frito Lay chip brands, and consumers are invited to submit their sandwich. Using a specially created algorithm, the site will spit out a match for you just before noon the next day, to help you decide on what to pair your sammy with. Online 15-second pre-roll ads, in the vein of cheesy dating site commercials, will help drive traffic to the site.

Consumers are also invited to snap a photo of the pairing for a chance to win $25,000, and to date the photos have been strangely romantic, says Ignazi.

The dating site is supported by the aforementioned TV and pre-roll spots (launched on May 26) as well as digital banner ads and social media, including a dedicated Facebook and Twitter account for the dating site. It will run for two months and targets adults, 25 to 54, who pack a lunch to eat away from home.