Huge hires new creative team » strategy

Huge hires new creative team

Amy O'Neill and Tracy Wan join as the agency continues to strengthen its integrated offering.
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Huge has added two new creatives to its team in Toronto, hiring Amy O’Neill as art director (above, left) and Tracy Wan as copywriter.

This is the second time Huge has expanded its creative skill set over the last 12 months, having brought on executive creative director Allen Oke in August.

O’Neill and Wan are a team with nearly six years’ experience together, having most recently been at John St. and at Tribal prior to that.

“We need people who know how to tell a story, and they’ve told some really great stories,” Oke tells strategy, adding that he was particularly fond of their 2015 General Mills “#HowToDad” campaign for its fun and original insights on being a father.

“It was impressive that they were able to empathize and to create something very theatrical that was not of their own lives at the time, which requires imagination and understanding of what that’s like,” he says. “I thought that was an extreme example of how talented they are.”

Some of their other work includes Canadian Tire’s “Shovel it Forward” ad and “16 and Under” for the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Oke notes that working on the (less traditional) Huge team means O’Neill and Wan will be part of the entire experience — from web to UX to developing strategic thought processes.

When Oke was hired, it was the beginning of an effort to build the brand design practice at the agency, complimenting its existing strength in digital and product design to create a more robust integrated offering for clients. According to managing director Paul Burns, the future of Huge means being comfortable taking on all of the complex and difficult challenges clients throw their way.

“Every industry vertical that we deal with across retail, across financial services, across CPR, healthcare, travel and tourism, you name it — every single one of those vertices is being disrupted to some degree by digital and technology,” he says. “What we find is happening is clients are trying to figure out what their unique advantage and point of view is given the state of the world today.”