Media

News

Media watch

1. Media owner balance sheet woes: In 2002, debt-burdened media owners have reduced investment in audience research and delayed the launch of a newly licensed TV channel in Toronto. Looking ahead, the need for media owners to improve margin by increasing yield (higher prices) and decreasing costs (content and service) will accelerate the friction between sellers and buyers.

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Media auditing comes to Canada

Today’s new emphasis on media buying accountability is spawning a North American interest in a practice that’s been common in the U.K. and Europe for decades – media auditing, or third-party examination of media buys.

News

Tracking a difficult target

The 18-to-34 demo is increasingly tough to catch, particularly those of the female persuasion. With so many vehicles in which to advertise – from television to the Web – cutting through the clutter becomes ever more important.

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Is interactive TV broadcasting?

The question of whether interactive TV is broadcasting or not may be simple to ask, but it’s one of many that could have a huge impact on how ITV is regulated in Canada.

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In praise of older women

There are almost 31.5 million people in Canada, based on the 2001 Census, and slightly over half (50.4%) are and always have been women. Many companies in the retail, food, beauty, and home product categories continue to give women far more than a 50% marketing emphasis. But we’re all still trapped in a ’90s mindset: One where only younger women matter.

News

Fusion confusion

Confusion and concern continue to swirl around the Unity Project, and a number of questions still remain unanswered. Top of mind: will data integration increase the industry’s already high research costs? Throw in the term ‘data fusion’ and that confounds the situation even more.

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What women (really) want

‘What a woman wants is one of the great questions which I have not been able to answer,’ Sigmund Freud once said tellingly. Today, companies spend an astonishing amount in an attempt to answer Freud’s question, with pallid results.

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The death of prime time

The crazier predictions about the advertising business – and there have been plenty of those – have not usually come true.

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Outlook 2003

Canada’s newspapers are like white-knuckled toddlers clinging to the reins of a bucking horsey ride at the local mall. One minute ad revenue is up, the next it takes a gut-churning dive.

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Market Meter

Conventional broadcast TV
5 out of 5
There is little highly-rated inventory remaining for the rest of the year, particularly in Ontario, Alberta, and B.C. Christmas buys are currently in progress.

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Globe focuses on ‘quality’ readers while Post starts to rebuild

The bi-annual release of the Audit Bureau of Circulations’ newspaper numbers is much anticipated by buyers these days: Many get a real kick out of the vastly different spins presented by the Toronto dailies in their own coverage of the event.

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The 2001 Census: Cold facts mask real lives

The 2001 Census is a cold, heartless compendium of data embellished with bureaucratic terms such as ‘step-families’ ‘occupied private dwellings’ and ‘centenarians.’ The act of reading the results of a census is made doubly difficult because there are too many numbers to digest.

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Product usage polling expanded, PDAs included for the first time

Supplementing its 2002 Interim Report, NADbank recently released its product and lifestyle data for 2002, including detailed information on the shopping habits, product usage, media preferences and lifestyle characteristics of Canadians.

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Letters

Picking up the recency gauntlet
The following letter from Erwin Ephron is a response to ‘Erwin, I beg to differ’ (Strategy MEDIA, Oct. 21/02, p. 10), an Op/Ed contribution on recency by Ed Weiss, VP, associate media director at Echo Advertising + Marketing.

News

NADbank transforming to address concerns

The NADbank study has been undergoing a transformation in an effort to bring more information on newspapers to the media planning and buying community. Throughout the changes, the study continues to provide statistically reliable measures on newspaper readership.