Media

News

Specialties reach out to retune image

With so much choice on the airwaves today, channels are having to do more to differentiate themselves from the pack – whether through a complete brand makeover or by shuffling their program offerings to more effectively target their demos. Strategy offers a rundown of some recent TV transformations.

News

Cue the quality infomercial

To media buyers, paid-programming shows have always been the Rodney Dangerfield of television, with meager audiences and graveyard time slots adding up to no respect.

News

PVRs won’t kill the TV ad

Advertisers already weary of battling clutter and zapping have been following with dread the rise of new enemies in the commercial avoidance battle – personal video recorders (PVRs), video-on-demand (VOD) and time-shifted television viewing. Reports of studies from the U.S. that found PVR users skip more ads, combined with ReplayTV technology that automatically skips commercials, have added to their concerns.

News

Harnessing passion

As advertisers and media professionals continue to search for new ways to reach their consumers, those consumers are just as busily using their internal radar to shoot down – or avoid – the thousands of brand messages that we place in their path.

News

Buyers buoyant about Deep Sky

Corus Radio has unleashed a new one-stop radio shop called Deep Sky that media buyers expect will increase its business and attract more national advertisers to its 50-station chain. While much of what Toronto-based Deep Sky is doing isn’t new to the business, buyers are enthused by the firm’s unprecedented offers of guaranteed national and regional inventory, one contact person and one-bill invoicing for an entire radio campaign.

News

Are teens abandoning traditional media?

Hood: I’d like to start with Jeff, our media person, by asking you whether you think it’s still possible to reach teens effectively using a traditional broadcast-based media plan, or whether marketers and buyers need to take advantage of some of the more niche offerings out there to do a good job.

News

Meet Mr. Fusion

Admit it: you’re not really sure what data fusion is. You know that a CMDC committee is working on something grandly dubbed the Unity Project. You know that it has something to do with cutting down on duplicated research in Canada by mashing the present research into super databases – but the details on how this would work, and what it will mean for the larger Canadian marketing community are fuzzy. If that’s the case, it’s time to meet Mr. Fusion – a.k.a. Tony Jarvis, SVP, director of strategic insights at New York’s MediaCom.

News

Lost in TV land

I’m watching an episode of The Sopranos right now. And I’m not watching this season of Sex and the City.
Normally, neither of these two things would seem all that remarkable, except for the fact that I’ve already seen the entirety of the current season of Sex and the City, and the episode of The Sopranos that I’m watching isn’t set to air on The Movie Network – or on HBO, the originating network in the States – for a full two weeks.

News

Media planning secrets

Few advertisers in Canada have media planning specialists on staff. They rely on the expertise of their advertising agency. But media departments face unprecedented pressures from clients and agency management to keep media planning and buying costs down. There are consequences.

News

Blazing a trail to the consumer

Walter Odenthal works at Skoki, a small back-country hiking lodge located one mountain range east of B.C.’s Lake Louise. I don’t know Walter very well but he looks like he’s in his mid 40s. He’s tall and like most mountain people, very lean and very fit. Rumour has it he came from a well-to-do family in Germany. Some say he’s a concert pianist.
What I know for sure is that he builds magnificent hiking trails, and in my conversations with Walter, I detected a strong parallel between planning mountain hiking trails and planning media campaigns.

News

Thwarting mother nature

Erwin Ephron, partner at New York media consultancy Ephron, Papazian & Ephron, is known around the world as the father of recency planning. When he first started preaching his approach in 1995, he says many in the industry interpreted the idea that ‘a single exposure can have an effect on which brand a consumer will buy’ to mean, ‘oh boy, now advertisers can spend less money.’ Ephron soon disabused them of that notion by explaining that advertisers don’t need heavy repetition, but instead they need more weeks of advertising.

News

Is TV measurement measuring up?

All measurement is flawed. That’s the tough reality TV buyers, sellers and researchers have been dealing with for years. But that doesn’t mean TV measurement couldn’t be better – some say much better – than it is right now.

News

Leaders in a new game?

The media planning and buying industry cannot decide whether it is staring into the abyss or about to take an exciting leap into the future. Profit margins are under siege from an aggressive client audit culture and agencies’ willingness to undercut each other on price in their desperation to win and retain business.

News

Buyers foster Hollywood connection

Tony Soprano’s ratfink goombah is crouched down in a parked car, shooting off his mouth to an FBI agent. Outside the window, we see an Office Depot store. ‘Youse want me to wear a wire?’ grunts the goombah. ‘Yeah,’ replies the feebie. ‘Need batteries? Let’s get some at Office Depot.’ Fade to black.
Product placement? Fuhgeddaboudit. Getting your brand actually written into the script of a huge hit like The Sopranos is an even bigger deal than having its characters handle or consume your products on-screen – theoretically persuading viewers to do likewise.

News

Post rebound predicted; Metro corners youth

The National Post is losing and the Globe and Mail is gaining, according to the latest Interim Report issued by the Newspaper Audience Databank (NADbank). But some media buyers wonder whether the numbers, which showed the Post losing 23% of its readers in the Toronto market, accurately reflect the current situation for the CanWest-owned daily newspaper.