Study to profile affluent

A new study of affluent Canadians gets under way in May, drawing on the 17 years' experience New York's Mendelsohn Media Research has built up studying affluent u.s. households.Canadian consultantTony Jarvis, president of Toronto's Jarvis Sherman Jarvis advertising and marketing consultants,...

A new study of affluent Canadians gets under way in May, drawing on the 17 years’ experience New York’s Mendelsohn Media Research has built up studying affluent u.s. households.

Canadian consultant

Tony Jarvis, president of Toronto’s Jarvis Sherman Jarvis advertising and marketing consultants, worked with Mendelsohn on the study.

Jarvis says it will be national, in English and French, and will survey Canadian households with incomes above $75,000.

He says 16,800 surveys will be mailed out with the expectation 6,000 will be returned.

He says the syndicated study will be ready in October.

According to Jarvis, Mendelsohn’s u.s. 16-page survey will be Canadianized for the study here.

He says, in the u.s., Mendelsohn uses Donnelly Marketing’s ‘Family INcome Detector’ (find) to target its mail-out.

Here, he says, the survey is drawing on Compusearch data, among other things.

Doesn’t clash

Jarvis says he does not see Mendelsohn’s Canadian survey clashing with PMB Print Measurement Bureau’s plans.

He says he understands the pmb’s new study – once slated to survey affluent households in Canada – is now a more general business study.

Mendelsohn President Mitch Lurin says the Canadian survey will save space over the u.s. survey because there will be fewer questions on radio, tv and cable habits.

Canadian content

In effect, says Lurin, there will be two or three ‘blank pages’ available to be used as the survey here dictates.

Jarvis says publishers pay the main cost of the study, but others can – for a fee – gain access to the report.

Lurin says it costs $68,000 to subscribe to Mendelsohn’s Canadian survey.

He says there are discounts available for publishers with multiple titles.