Sleeman: just the basics

Sleeman Brewery launched its first entry into tv late last month with an innovative approach - no bikini-clad girls, no Sixties soundtrack - just a clear glass bottle of Sleeman beer with nothing to hide.In fact, each of those points is...

Sleeman Brewery launched its first entry into tv late last month with an innovative approach – no bikini-clad girls, no Sixties soundtrack – just a clear glass bottle of Sleeman beer with nothing to hide.

In fact, each of those points is the focus of one of three 30-second commercials.

Each spot begins with a reverse banner – ‘Bikinis,’ ‘Nothing to Hide’ and ‘Groovy’ – and the bottle of Sleeman on its side at the bottom of the screen, and ends with the tagline, ‘Good beer since 1834.’

Sleeman produces Cream Ale, Silver Creek Lager and Premium Light for the Ontario market at its microbrewery in Guelph, Ont.

The campaign is the first work for Sleeman’s new agency Geoffrey B. Roche & Partners of Toronto, which was hired this past December.

Creative credits go to Geoffrey Roche, creative/art director; Paul Ruta, David Rosenberg and Judy John, writers; David Medlock, producer; Spin Productions, post-production; Stanley Wong, cameraman; and Harris/Cole/Wilde, music.

Campaigning for hope

kelley Advertising of Toronto has put together an ad campaign to support the annual March Fund drive of The Kidney Foundation of Canada, using the theme, ‘Give All The Hope You Can.’

About 95,000 volunteers are expected to canvass door-to-door during the month-long effort.

Kelley has created a 30-second tv spot, both English and French, and a radio spot to be aired nationally. Other elements include print, posters, countercards, id buttons, donation boxes and sweatshirts.

The theme and copy were developed by Paul Breithaupt, vice-president, creative, with broadcast production handled by LTB Productions.

CHOM-FM gives satisfaction

montreal’s CHOM-FM 97.7 is reminding radio listeners that it is the ‘Home of Rock & Roll’ with a new 30-second tv spot created by its agency, Taxi.

The camera pans dead plants while the music of rival radio stations plays in the background.

The camera approaches a dead cactus as the station changes to chom-fm and the sound of the Rolling Stones song Satisfaction, bringing the cactus back to life.

Voiceover is provided by John Derringer, the station’s new morning man.

Credits go to Paul Lavoie, Francois Sauve and Patrick Franks, creative; Louise Richard, producer; and at La Cie de films, Glenn Bydwell, director, and Joanne Laplante, producer.