ACA backs use of SI

The 200-member Association of Canadian Advertisers has endorsed the use of Sports Illustrated's Canadian edition as an advertising vehicle so long as it is legal to do so.Dennis Stoakes, chairman of aca's print committee, confirmed for Strategy last week the association's...

The 200-member Association of Canadian Advertisers has endorsed the use of Sports Illustrated’s Canadian edition as an advertising vehicle so long as it is legal to do so.

Dennis Stoakes, chairman of aca’s print committee, confirmed for Strategy last week the association’s 25-member board of directors made the decision after its April 21 meeting in Toronto.

The 78-year-old aca has 200 of Canada’s largest corporations as members and their advertising spending represents 85% of all national ad revenues.

The Institute of Canadian Advertising (ica), an association of ad agencies, and the Canadian Advertising Foundation (caf), a resource organization for advertisers, agencies, suppliers and the media, have joined the Canadian Magazine Publishers Association (cmpa) and other groups calling for Ottawa to disallow the publication of magazines such as Canadian Sports Illustrated.

Stoakes, a vice-president of the aca and vice-president and director of media (North America) for Hiram Walker, says from an advertiser’s perspective Canadian Sports Illustrated is another media alternative.

John Foss, president of the Toronto-based aca, says the position of the association is to encourage members to use whatever legal medium is available.

Foss says the aca has no powers to penalize or control its members should they decide to act independently.

Sandra Berry, managing director of Time Canada, part of New York’s Time Warner media conglomerate which owns Sports Illustrated, says she is delighted with the aca’s decision, calling it consistent with all its other policies.

Berry reiterated Revenue Canada has not found Canadian Sports Illustrated to be doing anything illegal.

Catherine Keachie, executive director of the cmpa, called the aca decision disappointing.

However, says Keachie, the real issue is the federal government enforcing a 30-year-old policy on the magazine publishing industry.

Barry Bousfield, director of advertising at Black & Decker Canada  one of the advertisers in the first Canadian Sports Illustrated  was unconcerned about the aca decision.

Bousfield says his company has always sought the best vehicle available for its advertising.

New Statistics Canada figures show in 1990-91 the entire Canadian magazine industry’s profits were $9.3 million, down from $18 million in the previous 12 months.

Patrick O’Callaghan and Roger Tasse, recently announced as co-chairman of a federal task force on the magazine industry, could not be reached for comment.

At press-time, the other names of task force members had not been made public.