B.C. food, beverage campaign 3-fold

Two small agencies in Victoria found themselves handed the plum account for 1993 when they were awarded a contract from the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture to launch an awareness campaign for nearly every product 'grown, raised, caught and processed in B.C.'Suburbia...

Two small agencies in Victoria found themselves handed the plum account for 1993 when they were awarded a contract from the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture to launch an awareness campaign for nearly every product ‘grown, raised, caught and processed in B.C.’

Suburbia Studio, set up by Russ Willms and Mary-Lynn Willms, will serve as a creative shop.

Victoria-based Windrim Kleyn Lim will handle the strategic planning and public relations.

Umbrella campaign

The two firms were asked to create an umbrella campaign that would clearly identify b.c. products, at both the restaurant and the grocery store levels, in what the trade calls from ‘gate to plate’ promotions.

Their umbrella identity will cover about 280 commodity food and beverage groups, including everything from apples to salmon.

The campaign will set the tone for the suppliers’ in-store promotions, direct mail and free-standing inserts.

The objective in year one of the four-year program is to create brand awareness for b.c. products under a logo and theme developed earlier by different agencies: ‘Buy B.C: The best things in life are B.C.’

The advertising campaign, scheduled to launch mid-August, will run in newspapers, outdoor and transit.

Windrim Kleyn Lim will tackle the strategic issues and media relations by providing the media testimonials of growers’ success in various regions throughout the province.

The two agencies will co-ordinate the creation and mailing of several million flyers to consumers and food suppliers, showing consumers the inherent value in purchasing b.c. products.

The third component of the government program is to measure the results of the campaign against sales forecasts of participating suppliers and growers in the program.

It is hoped the identity program created by the two agencies will boost sales in b.c.’s $135-million fresh vegetable and mushroom growers’ ‘salad coalition’ of 17 vegetable growing companies.

The identity program is also expected to help raise awareness of the wild salmon catch – b.c.’s largest single food commodity with an annual wholesale value of $360 million.

‘We want to show that b.c. has an abundance,’ says Robert Mitchell, president of Windrim Kleyn and Lim.