Bill may hamper reseach methods

This fall, Bill C-62 will be proclaimed in Parliament.Ivor Thompson, director of Thompson Lightstone in Toronto, says a part of the bill, Clause 46, could seriously affect the marketing and survey research industry.Thompson, a member of the Canadian Advertising Research Foundation,...

This fall, Bill C-62 will be proclaimed in Parliament.

Ivor Thompson, director of Thompson Lightstone in Toronto, says a part of the bill, Clause 46, could seriously affect the marketing and survey research industry.

Thompson, a member of the Canadian Advertising Research Foundation, is carf’s representative on the Canadian Survey Research Council.

He says in a draft memo to carf members the future of one of the research industry’s ‘fundamental elements’ is in danger because of Clause 46.

The clause says, ‘The crtc may, by order, prohibit or regulate the carriage of any class of unsolicited telecommunications on the telecommunications facilities of a Canadian carrier to the extent that the [crtc] considers it necessary to prevent undue inconvenience or nuisance, giving regard to freedom of expression.’

Thompson suggests in the memo members should ‘think of marketing and survey research in the context of your business if telephone interviewing was severely curtailed.’

Communications Canada staff and representatives from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission will meet July 27 to discuss liaison between the industry and the crtc on the enforcement of the new bill.

There is already talk in Ottawa, says Thompson, that once the privacy regulations are established, they will be expanded to cover mail surveys and then to door-to-door solicitation.

To properly represent the survey research industry and those who use its data, adequate funding is needed so they can be properly represented at the new Telecommunications Privacy Protection Foundation and Telecommunications Privacy Protection Agency level, Thompson says in the memo.