Bell calls on humor for TV spots

Two 30-second tv spots for Bell Canada humorously show what life would be without two of its special features, Call Display and Call Answer.'Dinner,' for Call Display, features a busy working mother trying to get dinner ready when she is trapped...

Two 30-second tv spots for Bell Canada humorously show what life would be without two of its special features, Call Display and Call Answer.

‘Dinner,’ for Call Display, features a busy working mother trying to get dinner ready when she is trapped on the phone by a gossipy friend.

Pandemonium ensues behind her as the children try to help in the kitchen.

The moral: if mom had Call Display, which shows the number of the person calling and lets you know who it is, she may have decided to call her friend at a more convenient time.

‘Breakfast Meeting’ starts with a harried young man rushing into his apartment to answer the phone and not quite making it.

The voiceover tells us if he had Call Answer, which is Bell’s automatic answering service, he would have known his breakfast meeting was cancelled.

Both spots will air in Ontario through Aug. 20, with a Bargain Days tag offering savings for signing up for the services, and will continue without the tag after that.

The campaign was created by Leo Burnett, Toronto.

Creative credits go to Martin Shewchuk, creative director; Lynda Headland, writer; Judy Turner-Blain, art director; and Aggie Brook, agency producer.

The production house was ltb, with music and sound from Ted Rosnick.

Racetrack means money

seven top harness drivers sing the praises of Toronto’s Greenwood Raceway and its new consumer promotion in a 30-second tv spot for the Ontario Jockey Club that airs today.

A radio spot has also been created.

The drivers lip-synch to a Beatles tune called Money that includes the words, ‘Money, that’s what I want’ for ‘Straight Eight,’ a new promotion that features $25,000 to be won every live racing night.

Race-goers are asked to fill out a ballot predicting which horses will win races three through 10. Twenty-five ballots are drawn, and those contestants are in the running to win $25,000 if all their selections win.

If no one correctly identifies the winners, the next best entry wins the second prize of $1,000.

The consumer promotion was developed by Warwick & Associates, the Vickers & Benson promotion and public relations division.

Advertising was created by the v&b team of Terry Bell, Craig Shibley and Mark Dwyer.