Event Marketing: Tennis serves up summer activities

Michael Lang is president of Lang & Associates, a Toronto-based international event marketing agency with offices in Vancouver, Montreal and Atlanta.Kirsten Armitage is an account executive with Lang & Associates, and co-ordinator for the Event Marketing column. Contributions, ideas, media releases...

Michael Lang is president of Lang & Associates, a Toronto-based international event marketing agency with offices in Vancouver, Montreal and Atlanta.

Kirsten Armitage is an account executive with Lang & Associates, and co-ordinator for the Event Marketing column. Contributions, ideas, media releases and feedback should be directed to Kirsten at (416) 229-0060 or fax (416) 229-1210.

Tennis provides marketers with a targetted vehicle through which to reach tennis enthusiasts, the majority of whom are in the 25-49 age range, high school and university-educated and focussed in the regions of Ontario, Quebec and b.c.

There are more than 3.4 million tennis players in Canada, 37% of whom reside in major metropolitan areas with populations of more than one million.

Although participants, spectatorship and viewership numbers appear to have flattened, there is excellent potential for the growth of tennis in Canada.

The capacity to recruit, develop and retain young tennis athletes is increasing each year as the result of developmental initiatives such as Tennis Canada’s 1992 introduction of Youth Tennis Centres.

There are more than 45 centres in operation, and it is projected that more than 100 will exist by 1996.

Recent research indicates the benefits of tennis as excellent physical and mental exercise for people of all ages. This should also facilitate an increase in participation in the 1990s and beyond, especially with the growing seniors’ market.

Canadian tennis appears to be fairly well-positioned in terms of potential talent, particularly in the men’s division.

Greg Rusedski has established himself as the top Canadian on the international scene, while Sebastien Lareau and Daniel Nestor are Canada’s leading players in Davis Cup competition this year.

Bobby Kokavec is viewed as a good prospect as he begins his professional career.

In women’s tennis, Sonya Jeyaseelan, Caroline Delisle, Stephanie Tibbits and Melanie Bernard are all shaping up as top Canadian players.