Letters: BoM tv spots fun to watch

I really believe the notion of great advertising as something that invites people to make decisions is both excellent and useful.Also very appropriate in a new world where preference and awareness don't seem to deliver the way they used to.And I...

I really believe the notion of great advertising as something that invites people to make decisions is both excellent and useful.

Also very appropriate in a new world where preference and awareness don’t seem to deliver the way they used to.

And I have to agree with Barry Base (‘BoM’s terrific big-idea piece’) in the June 13 issue, the BoM tv spots were fun to watch.

But the discussion of this creative couldn’t be complete without a closer look at what it was specifically designed to do.

These are direct response ads, the beginning of a dialogue, a relationship. The creative has only one job: convince people to connect with the bank.

Even if we supposed consumers believe that the Bank of Montreal is capable of doing business in an entirely new way (and we know how easy it is to change basic perceptions like this), the question remains, did people believe that the Book of Possibilities was worth getting?

And, furthermore, if they did think it was worth getting, does the promise continue? What is the quality of the relationship after all the grps have been spent?

Included with some brochures I’ve seen at my branch, I received a profile of a 29-year-old guy who’s going back to school.

Not something I’m currently aspiring to do. And not exactly where I stand financially.

Is it possible to convince consumers that the bank has changed? Will consumers encounter a new way of doing business and a new attitude when they walk through those doors?

If great creative helps people make decisions, the decision I’d vote for is the one where consumers actually connect with the bank and aren’t disappointed when they do so.

Rob Worling

Creative Director

Cundari Group

North York, Ont.