Globe low-key about possible strike

National newspaper The Globe and Mail will still publish even if there is a strike or lockout at the Thomson-owned daily, says a spokeswoman for the paper.Anne Marren says, 'We will publish a newspaper. It will be a healthy newspaper.'Still negotiatingAt...

National newspaper The Globe and Mail will still publish even if there is a strike or lockout at the Thomson-owned daily, says a spokeswoman for the paper.

Anne Marren says, ‘We will publish a newspaper. It will be a healthy newspaper.’

Still negotiating

At press-time, the Globe and the Southern Ontario Newspaper Guild were still negotiating a new contract.

song negotiators could not be reached for comment.

The legal strike or lockout deadline was Sept. 30.

Strategy learned Sept. 28 – and Marren confirmed – that Globe reporters were removing their bylines beginning Sept. 29.

Grant Crosbie, vice-president of marketing and advertising sales at the Globe, says a fax has gone to the paper’s advertisers telling them about the situation. Crosbie is optimistic talks will reach a satisfactory conclusion.

Advertiser response to a potential strike has been muted.

Most regular Globe advertisers contacted refused to speculate on the situation or say what their contingency plans might be should they need to place their message elsewhere in print.

Mike Quinn, a spokesman for IBM Canada in Markham, Ont., says the computer giant does not comment on situations such as the one involving the Globe.

A spokeswoman for Toronto’s Mirvish Productions – another heavy Globe advertiser for big budget Toronto musicals such as Les Miserables, Crazy For You, Miss Saigon and the upcoming Tommy – says the company will deal with a strike or lockout when it occurs.

Barry Avrich, vice-president of Toronto’s Echo Advertising, places considerable advertising in the Globe for such clients as Live Entertainment of Canada, American Express and Alliance Communications.

Avrich says he will move his clients’ ads to other papers to reach their target audiences in the event the Globe does not publish.

At The Toronto Star and The Financial Post, the Globe’s principal advertising competition, the response to a possible work stoppage at the Thomson paper was also low-key.

Fred Ross, a spokesman for the Star – which endured a bitter strike in 1992 – says the paper has no plans to take advantage of the Globe and solicit its regular advertisers.

Chuck Amis, director of advertising at The Financial Post, says his paper’s preparations in case of a strike or lockout at the Globe have been informal.

Amis says the Post may see ‘a bit of an upsurge’ in retail advertising, where the Globe has been stronger than his paper, and perhaps more classified, recruitment and announcement advertising.

The last strike at the Globe was in 1964, when at the same time a labor dispute hit the Star and the now-defunct Toronto Telegram.