Letters: Just turn the set off

In regard to your editorial, 'The power of one,' in the Nov. 28 issue.In all of the overactive imaginations of small-minded, politically correct people such as yourselves, has no one ever thought of just turning the damned tv set off.In the...

In regard to your editorial, ‘The power of one,’ in the Nov. 28 issue.

In all of the overactive imaginations of small-minded, politically correct people such as yourselves, has no one ever thought of just turning the damned tv set off.

In the real world of interactive media, which, I hasten to stress, is nowhere in sight as yet, we have the power, responsibility to be our own programmers, and if we want to tune out or in, it is strictly our own business.

You suggest that the viewer can now respond more adamantly, and even boycott the message or the product.

What I strongly suspect, and have advised my clients, is that the end destination is now entirely up to the consumer.

In your limited scope of the interactive world, you would run and hide your head before even assessing the scope of the consumer’s reach.

I would recommend that we all take a breather and let the consumers do as they have always done; sample the products and services for themselves (somewhat easier to do in the new interactive world) and let common sense reign.

In fact, I would never patronize the viewer consumer, in the new interactive that I see and advise all our clientele, the consumer is now the only destination worth knowing.

David Yorke

New Media Opportunities

Harrison Young Pesonen & Newell

Toronto