Degree turns up the temperature in racy spot

Showing people in extreme situations is a typical approach in antiperspirant advertising. And while Lever Pond's latest campaign for Degree continues to show people in those extreme circumstances, there are no CEOs in crisp white shirts giving high-powered presentations, buff, sweaty...

Showing people in extreme situations is a typical approach in antiperspirant advertising. And while Lever Pond’s latest campaign for Degree continues to show people in those extreme circumstances, there are no CEOs in crisp white shirts giving high-powered presentations, buff, sweaty men working in steel mills or beautiful women playing beach volleyball.

Instead, the campaign, created by Palmer Jarvis DDB, features ordinary people in extraordinary personal situations while a meter on the screen measures their increasing degree of stress. One spot features a lingerie-clad woman attempting to seduce her paunchy husband three times only to find him asleep, then uninterested, and finally ready – but in matching bra and panties. In a second spot, a man in a bar is shown being approached by three strangers – the first merely annoying, the second menacing and the third very pregnant – each of whom asks ‘Remember Me?’

The campaign, which targets 18- to 34-year-olds, is an attempt to break away from the creative pack and reintroduce consumers to Degree, says Esther Lem, vice-president, brand development at Toronto-based Lever Pond’s.

‘We thought, do consumers really care if their pits are dry while they are playing volleyball?’ she says. ‘No, they wear antiperspirant so that they don’t sweat in personal situations.’

The current campaign builds on previous Degree advertising that featured a man losing his keys in a water fountain while waiting to meet his fiancé’s parents. However, in that commercial, the situation was not extreme enough to resonate with consumers, says Lem. The new campaign rectifies that.

By incorporating the stress meter on the screen, the advertising is able to illustrate Degree’s ‘Body heat-activated’ quality.

‘Our testing shows that Canadians know that Degree is ‘body heat-activated,’ even if they don’t know what that means,’ she says. ‘With these spots we can illustrate that clearly.’

RBC, TD and Lululemon among most valuable brands

Once again, the financial institutions and apparel brand landed in Kantar's top 10 lists for their sectors.

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In the recently released 2022 edition of the Kantar BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands survey, several Canadian companies landed in the top rankings, namely in the financial institutions and apparel categories.

Two Canadian brands made an appearance in the survey’s global banks rankings: RBC holds second position (57th overall), while TD ranks eighth (72nd overall), with brand values worth US$39.5 billion (up 43% from last year) and US$29.7 billion (up 47%), respectively. TD was among the fastest risers in the overall Top 100 survey, climbing 18 positions.

Lululemon takes fourth place as the most valuable apparel brand, behind Nike, Zara and Adidas. The Canadian athletic-wear company is valued at US$20.4 billion.

“Our 2022 rankings demonstrate both the resilience of our Canadian banking brands and their ability to create brand value by connecting with consumers to outperform other brands on the world stage,” said Scott Megginson, president of Kantar Canada in a release. “They are leaders among brands in the global financial services sector and the number one position is coming within reach for RBC.

“It is also encouraging to see how Lululemon has continued to build brand value as people return to work,” adds Megginson. “Its reputation for innovation, quality and reliability allows them to command a premium in the market.”

Overall, Apple has landed in the #1 position and is projected to become the first trillion-dollar brand. It’s brand value sits at US$947.1 billion, and is commended in the survey for its ongoing diversification strategy across its hardware, software and services portfolio. Apple moved up from second position in 2021.

Google has taken the second top spot, up one from the previous year, increasing its brand value by 79% to US$819.6 billion. In third place, Amazon dropped down two spots from last year’s #1 position, and this year its brand value equates to US$705.6 billion.

In 2022, more than three quarters of brand value originated from U.S. companies, with media and entertainment, business solutions and technology providers and retail categories contributing to over half the total value of the Top 100.

According to Kantar, sector leaders emerged from a variety of industries, with technology and luxury brands growing the fastest – 46% for consumer technology and 45% for luxury. Automotive growth grew by 34%, and banks by 30%, compared to other sectors such as apparel at 20% and personal care by 17%.

Combined, the value of the world’s Top 100 most valuable brands has increased by 23% to US$8.7 trillion in the last year. Set for release in October 2022, Kantar will rank Canada’s top 40 most valuable brands, along with reports and insights for its market.

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