Degree turns up the temperature in racy spot

Showing people in extreme situations is a typical approach in antiperspirant advertising. And while Lever Pond's latest campaign for Degree continues to show people in those extreme circumstances, there are no CEOs in crisp white shirts giving high-powered presentations, buff, sweaty...

Showing people in extreme situations is a typical approach in antiperspirant advertising. And while Lever Pond’s latest campaign for Degree continues to show people in those extreme circumstances, there are no CEOs in crisp white shirts giving high-powered presentations, buff, sweaty men working in steel mills or beautiful women playing beach volleyball.

Instead, the campaign, created by Palmer Jarvis DDB, features ordinary people in extraordinary personal situations while a meter on the screen measures their increasing degree of stress. One spot features a lingerie-clad woman attempting to seduce her paunchy husband three times only to find him asleep, then uninterested, and finally ready – but in matching bra and panties. In a second spot, a man in a bar is shown being approached by three strangers – the first merely annoying, the second menacing and the third very pregnant – each of whom asks ‘Remember Me?’

The campaign, which targets 18- to 34-year-olds, is an attempt to break away from the creative pack and reintroduce consumers to Degree, says Esther Lem, vice-president, brand development at Toronto-based Lever Pond’s.

‘We thought, do consumers really care if their pits are dry while they are playing volleyball?’ she says. ‘No, they wear antiperspirant so that they don’t sweat in personal situations.’

The current campaign builds on previous Degree advertising that featured a man losing his keys in a water fountain while waiting to meet his fiancé’s parents. However, in that commercial, the situation was not extreme enough to resonate with consumers, says Lem. The new campaign rectifies that.

By incorporating the stress meter on the screen, the advertising is able to illustrate Degree’s ‘Body heat-activated’ quality.

‘Our testing shows that Canadians know that Degree is ‘body heat-activated,’ even if they don’t know what that means,’ she says. ‘With these spots we can illustrate that clearly.’

The latest in tech: Why it matters and how you can use it

With the pandemic continuing to keep in-person events off the table, innovation isn’t just a bonus – it’s an imperative. ...

With the pandemic continuing to keep in-person events off the table, innovation isn’t just a bonus – it’s an imperative. Companies need creative tech to engage with consumers, whether that’s live-streaming, gaming or data-driven personalization. This is the year that remote comes first, making it an opportune time to experiment with format, devices and tools.

Tags:


,