Superfan’s challenging Salt Lake mission for beer.com

Cameron Hughes, aka Superfan, called Strategy on his cell during the Olympics as he strolled through a McDonald's drive-thru in Salt Lake City to grab grub. Hughes, who you may recognize from Game Face on the Comedy Network or as the guy who goes 'absolutely nuts' in the stands at Blue Jays matches, explains that the 30-foot RV he rented for a 'Go Canada Go' mission isn't exactly nimble enough to handle corners in a parking lot.

Cameron Hughes, aka Superfan, called Strategy on his cell during the Olympics as he strolled through a McDonald’s drive-thru in Salt Lake City to grab grub. Hughes, who you may recognize from Game Face on the Comedy Network or as the guy who goes ‘absolutely nuts’ in the stands at Blue Jays matches, explains that the 30-foot RV he rented for a ‘Go Canada Go’ mission isn’t exactly nimble enough to handle corners in a parking lot.

About a month before the Olympic torch was lit, Hughes, along with Brian Stemmle (the fallen 1998 Olympic downhill skier) approached Labatt-funded beer.com to help finance his roadtrip to the Games. However, after discussions with the Web site, which is dedicated to hard-core brewsky fans, the journey turned into a promotion called ‘the Quest for Olympic Glory.’

‘We have 10 set objectives…and we’re filming them and downloading them on beer.com,’ said Hughes, who was a little too hyper for our early-morning chat. ‘It’s a fun, behind-the-scenes social look at what’s happening down here.’

The Superfan had his work cut out for him. His challenges were about as easy as landing a quadruple toe loop in figure skating; they included getting a date with a member of the Swedish women’s bobsled team, convincing Canadian golfer Mike Weir to make golf a Winter Olympics demonstration sport, and luring Wayne Gretzky into his Winnebago. As they made the rounds at various hotspots in Salt Lake, Hughes and Stemmle also handed out beer.com paraphernalia, like key chains and magnets, to those within the 19- to 30-year-old target demo.

Paul Gillespie, director of marketing at beer.com, says the objective was to produce interactive content and also garner exposure for the site. ‘There are others that offered pure sports coverage, but we saw an opportunity to look at the event through a beer lens,’ he joked.

Hughes, who runs five-year-old Toronto-based Superfan Sports & Entertainment and encourages consumers to make noise at promotional events for athletic teams and corporations, also negotiated a deal with Bell Mobility, which supplied him and Stemmle with mobiles. About thrice weekly, the duo were rung up by pesky Toronto radio station personalities on The Team, The Edge, and Mojo Radio – often as early as 5:30 am, much to their chagrin – looking for Olympic updates. And of course, Bell Mobility received a plug during those conversations.

What’s next for Hughes? In spring, he’ll use his seasoned guerilla tactics to drum up support for the Jays. For instance, he’ll make the rounds at high schools, attempting to get fickle teenagers fired up about what has become a struggling pro sport in Canada.