DM sales rise despite challenging year

Even though it's been a year tainted by economic uncertainty and public concern post 9/11, a report released this summer by the DMA in New York found that direct and interactive marketing is still growing at a healthy pace, and will become an increasingly efficient advertising tool.

Even though it’s been a year tainted by economic uncertainty and public concern post 9/11, a report released this summer by the DMA in New York found that direct and interactive marketing is still growing at a healthy pace, and will become an increasingly efficient advertising tool.

U.S. sales revenue from direct and interactive marketing increased 9% last year to $1.86 trillion from $1.71 trillion in 2000, representing more than 55.2% of total U.S. traditional advertising expenditures. According to the DMA’s Economic Impact report, sales are projected to reach more than $2 trillion in 2002.

Overall direct marketing sales growth is forecast at 8.3% annually through 2006, while ad spending is projected to grow at a slower annual rate of 6.5% per year.

Fall release expected for privacy legislation

The Ministry of Consumer and Business Affairs is hoping to introduce the draft privacy bill this fall when the house resumes, at the end of September.

Initially, officials hoped the bill would hit the legislative floor in early summer, thus coming into effect in the fall.

Chris Eby, spokesperson for the Ministry says it is still being worked on and that they are trying to incorporate as many of the ‘excellent’ recommendations submitted during the consultation stage this spring as possible. But he won’t tip his hat to any developments in such contentious areas as opt-in versus opt-out consent, other than to say they are still being looked at.

Introduced mid-February, the proposed Ontario legislation governs how the private, not-for-profit and health care sectors collect, use and disclose personal information.