I’ll buy that for a dollar!

You've got money burning a hole in your pocket. You're in Quebec. Quick! How much are you going to spend and where are you going to spend it? It might not necessarily mirror your decisions in the rest of Canada, so you'll need to figure out a different strategy. Telus Mobility, for example, says its media buys are longer than in English Canada because Quebecers take a while to warm up to new campaigns. Radio is used heavily because the population loves its French radio hosts and it successfully drives to retail. Below, client and agency folks share their insights.

You’ve got money burning a hole in your pocket. You’re in Quebec. Quick! How much are you going to spend and where are you going to spend it? It might not necessarily mirror your decisions in the rest of Canada, so you’ll need to figure out a different strategy. Telus Mobility, for example, says its media buys are longer than in English Canada because Quebecers take a while to warm up to new campaigns. Radio is used heavily because the population loves its French radio hosts and it successfully drives to retail. Below, client and agency folks share their insights.

The budget is based mostly on the revenue that Quebec represents within Canada. It’s not exactly that, but it’s pretty close. I would say it’s about 1.5 to 1. Revenue is one factor, but the other is we have three formidable competitors. And we need to have our message heard loud and clear. We [simultaneously use] TV, outdoor, Internet and print.

– Anne-Marie LaBerge, director, communications (Quebec),Telus Mobility, Montreal

At the end of the day you can divide the world into little segments, but ultimately at what cost? So I think it makes sense to try to achieve bigger scale and spend your money in media [rather than

separate creative].

– Serge Rancourt, president, Publicis, Montreal

When the Internet was launched, its development was much faster outside of Quebec than inside. The reason for that was cultural – French sites were not as abundant as English sites. So there’s a different reality. So when you want to advertise a product, you have to know the stage of development may not be the same.

– Claude Carrier, partner, Bos, Montreal

To some degree [figuring out how much to spend is determined by] bottom line revenue, and to some degree it’s a percentage of our revenue.

Our French-language revenues are significantly smaller than our English network and there’s only so much justification in expanding those dollars, so we just try to continually get more for our money….

[U.S. cable specialty networks like] A&E and CNN are very strong and have huge reach in the Canadian market. We can use them for the English network, but unfortunately there’s very little viewing in Quebec of the English U.S. cable networks, so it’s not a viable advertising vehicle for our French network.

So we have to look for alternatives. We’ve been fortunate enough to create an advertising strategy that communicates well in television, radio and outdoor. In Quebec we’ll use the outdoor and radio combination and in English Canada we’re using the television medium. For the last two years that’s worked.

– Rick Ridgway, SVP, television, The Weather Network, Toronto