Cadbury spills the Caramilk secret…sort of

After 40 years of teasing Canadians, Cadbury Canada is finally revealing how it gets all that soft, flowing caramel inside its Caramilk bar...through the 'enlightening' power of interpretive dance.

After 40 years of teasing Canadians, Cadbury Canada is finally revealing how it gets all that soft, flowing caramel inside its Caramilk bar…through the ‘enlightening’ power of interpretive dance.

The choreographed piece appeared as a pop-up guerrilla execution in Montreal in June, kicking off a new national campaign for the chocolate bar – the first in a decade to support the Canadian ‘Secret’ concept – that includes a variety of interpretive reveals of the Secret via TV, print and online at Stillwondering.ca, as well as 50 interactive audio boards in the Toronto subway system.

‘We wanted to tap into this history of wonder around the bar,’ explains Chris Beresford-Hill, CD at Saatchi & Saatchi New York, who developed the campaign for Cadbury. ‘It’s always been shrouded in mystery and secrets and we wanted to capitalize on that and evolve the campaign.’

Saatchi came up with ten different interpretive reveals in all, including the Secret as told in whale song, a note written in Elvish and the words of a Xhosa tribesman. And they certainly don’t beat around the bush. Every single move of the interpretive dance, for example, is chronologically representative of a step in the creation of the Caramilk bar. The same is true for the nine other iterations.

‘If someone actually speaks Xhosa they will probably get close to the real secret,’ admits Beresford-Hill. However, knowing that not all Canadians might want the decades-long mystery to be solved so as to maintain the sense of wonder that’s always surrounded the brand, ‘we threw in a couple little wrinkles,’ he says, to deter over-inquisitive candy killjoys.