BC Dairy goes bold to help people be proud about milk

An avant-garde creative approach aims to empower young people who are hesitant to publicly embrace the foods they love.

BC Dairy_MAIN IMAGE

The BC Dairy Association’s new avant-garde creative is a far cry from milk moustaches and pouring the beverage into cereal, but the industry association hopes its a way to entice younger Canadians.

The “Nothing Better” campaign is built around an interpretive dancer tiptoeing her way through glasses of milk, a decadent Fellini-esque dinner party, a mindfulness retreat and an urban overpass streetscape, populated by youngsters getting ice cream from a truck. 

“By exuding boldness and confidence, we want to empower people to keep enjoying the things they love, including milk and dairy products, without being held back by what other people might think,” says James Sadler, ECD of TAXI Vancouver, which developed the spot.

Milk consumption in liters per capita has been slowly declining for two decades, and BC Dairy hopes its hopes this new, experimental approach resonates with a younger demo, a group that’s experiencing particularly steep declines in milk consumption.

But the campaign is built on insights that while younger consumers are reticent to share their love of dairy products publicly – be it due to perceptions about its health value or environmental impact – they still like to enjoy the foods associated with it like ice cream, and the food they can make with it, according to Jennifer Woron, director of marketing for the BC Dairy Association,

“What we wanted to do with this campaign is to provide confidence in making choices for yourself and feeling good about them,”  she says.

“Taxi lead us in a very artistic approach to the creative, something that was very different than we’ve ever done for milk or dairy products,” she adds. “Our hope is that it does capture an attitude we are trying to portray, reinforcing making choices for yourself and doing it in an artistic, eye-catching, beautiful way.”

The “Nothing Better” campaign will run over the next year from August to July (across four phases that each focus on different themes) and will be video-focused, featuring 60, 30, 15, and 6-second spots. While it will air throughout the province in cinemas, the campaign will predominantly run on digital platforms with a focus on audio on, high-quality content destinations, the brand says.

BC Dairy is explicitly targeting younger consumers with the digital-first approach, but the cinema element has a role there too. “We had always envisioned this campaign to be in movie theatres,” Woron says, as the more cinematic approach it is taking will play well in that environment.

The organization is also rolling out its new barn/carton logo, aimed at consolidating the previously-separate BC Dairy Association and BC Milk brand identities into a single logo and brand.

The Association recently launched a more brand-focused campaign effort about promoting farmers and milk as a local product, “It’s ready,” BC Dairy’s focus on milk around meal time usage occasions, which will have another iteration coming in the fall.

The ad spend is comparable to other efforts it’s had in market around this time of year, Woron says. The media partner is OMD.