Royal banks on seniors show

The royal Bank is sponsoring four days of concerts at Toronto's Roy Thomson Hall by more than 800 senior performers.Beginning Aug. 17, the concerts will feature comedians, choirs, concert and dance bands, soloists and variety acts.Signed to appear are John Hollywood,...

The royal Bank is sponsoring four days of concerts at Toronto’s Roy Thomson Hall by more than 800 senior performers.

Beginning Aug. 17, the concerts will feature comedians, choirs, concert and dance bands, soloists and variety acts.

Signed to appear are John Hollywood, Herb Simpson, and the St. Thomas Silvertones, all from Ontario.

Bill McNeil, former host of CBC Radio’s early morning weekend show, Fresh Air, is back this year to emcee the concerts.

Pauline McGibbon, former lieutenant governor of Ontario, will present the Pauline McGibbon Life Achievement in the Arts Award to a senior performer or group of performers who have made a continuing and significant contribution to the arts over their lifetime.

Ecology still No. 1: Study

Despite a stalled economy, high concern for the environment has remained steady for the last six months, a new survey says.

Green Action Trends, a twice-a-year monitor of the beliefs and behavior of consumers in regard to ecological issues from The Creative Research Group in Toronto, found reducing, reusing and recycling has doubled in some instances.

In the Summer ’91 survey, it was reported that Canadians 18+ who always/often reduced stood at 47%. In Winter ’92 that percentage had leapt to 85%.

Similarly, those 37% of Canadians who reused in Summer ’91, grew to 79% in Winter ’91.

The smallest growth, the survey found, came at the recycling stage.

In Summer ’91, 40% of Canadians recycled something. In Winter ’91, 67% of them were doing so.

NutraSweet goes green

The nutrasweet swirl in the form of a 75-foot x 16-foot landscaped logo is gracing a hillside along Toronto’s Gardiner Expressway.

The huge logo marks The NutraSweet Company’s three-year participation in the Greening of the Gardiner project.

The Gardiner Expressway, one of Toronto’s busiest and most complained about highways, runs along the southern extremity of the city, cutting off Lake Ontario from the metropolis.