NADbank ’92 survey results

The results of the NADbank '92 survey measuring daily newspapers across Canada are further proof newspaper readership reflects the concerns and interests of the population with remarkable clarity.A comparison of the profile of the newspaper reader in the NADbank '91 survey...

The results of the NADbank ’92 survey measuring daily newspapers across Canada are further proof newspaper readership reflects the concerns and interests of the population with remarkable clarity.

A comparison of the profile of the newspaper reader in the NADbank ’91 survey versus the NADbank ’92 survey shows significant career changes in the Canadian adult population as a whole.

Not surprisingly, these occupational changes brought about significant change in readership of particular newspaper sections.

Among daily newspaper readers, the most dramatic increases were store owners/managers (up 69%), self-employed (up 61%) and students (up 33%.)

Declines were reported for blue-collar (down 7%), primary industry (down 40%), business owners/contractors (down 19%) and artistic/recreational (down 21%.)

These changes were reflective of changes reported by the survey for the adult population in general.

Interest to newspaper sections changed accordingly.

Increased popularity

While Canadian and World news with 86% readership by daily paper readers, and the movies/entertainment (78%) sections remain the highest reach sections, some other less-read sections gained popularity.

Readers’ financial concern and caution is evident in the increases reported for readership of the automotive and classified sections.

In the ’92 survey, the automotive section reports a 50% readership, up 12% from ’91 and the classifieds now report a 68% readership, up 5% from ’91.

Similarly, readership of the Careers and Help Wanted section is 57% in ’92, a 5% increase.

Lastly, the business/financial section increased by 5%, now reaching 64% of daily newspaper readers.

The proof is in the pudding.

Canadians turn to the newspaper when they need information.

The information which is of most interest to them will vary according to the concerns of the day, and, consequently, an analysis of newspaper readership can lend remarkable insight into the issues facing the Canadian population.

Michele Erskine is research manager at Media Buying Services in Toronto.