TL launch reaction

Despite a well publicized makeover from a swank wish book to a grainy read more suited to the stripped down 1990s, some media directors have yet to see a copy of the new-look Toronto Life.The January issue of the revamped monthly,...

Despite a well publicized makeover from a swank wish book to a grainy read more suited to the stripped down 1990s, some media directors have yet to see a copy of the new-look Toronto Life.

The January issue of the revamped monthly, which involves a stricter, more logical layout, new columns including one on sports and lifestyle items grouped together at the back, came out Dec. 28 but media executives Strategy spoke to had yet to see it to evaluate its changes for their clients.

Well in advance

One media director says if a magazine such as Time had been reformatted, a mock-up of it would have been on her desk well in advance of publication day.

Sherland Forde, senior vice-president and media director at Darcy Masius Benton & Bowles in Toronto, which has placed advertising in Toronto Life on behalf of Procter & Gamble, has not seen the redone magazine.

Forde says most publications make it a point of seeing media directors get copies of anything fresh.

Meanwhile, Toronto Life Publisher Marq de Villiers says the reactions he has had from advertisers about the changes have been either neutral or positive, although he cautions a clearer read of the situation is six months away.

One complaint

De Villiers says only one reader so far has complained about the changes, adding a man in Rochester, n.y. preferred the old Toronto Life because of its Toronto theatre listings.

He says the new editorial look makes Toronto Life’s advertising stand out, and the new layout makes more premium advertising positions available.

De Villiers does not believe the changes at Toronto Life will affect its much-sought-after affluent demographics, since some of those changes have been reader-driven.

Cynthia Evans, a spokeswoman for Toronto Life, says the magazine has 92,000 subscriptions and 13,000 newsstand sales at $2.50 a copy.