Crime Stoppers goes multimedia

Toronto and Regional Crime Stoppers has launched its first-ever multimedia, public service campaign with a little help from its friends in the industry.The campaign consists of one 30-second tv spot, three 30-second and three 60-second radio spots, transit shelter and subway...

Toronto and Regional Crime Stoppers has launched its first-ever multimedia, public service campaign with a little help from its friends in the industry.

The campaign consists of one 30-second tv spot, three 30-second and three 60-second radio spots, transit shelter and subway posters.

The purpose is to inspire more citizen involvement in catching bad guys through use of Crime Stoppers 222-tips phone program.

The advertising doesn’t pull any punches.

The story line of one of the 60-second radio spots is told from the point of view of a police photographer at the scene of the murder of a young girl.

The tv spot is silent with a series of stark questions appearing on the screen, among them: ‘Who would beat and rape a 75-year-old woman?’ ‘Who would get kids hooked on crack?’

One of the poster ads encourages the public to ‘Get involved in a criminal activity. Report one.’

Another poster, bearing the bewildered face of a young girl, asks the question: ‘This child was sexually assaulted. Does it have to be your daughter before you get involved?’

Creative agency is Kuleba & Shylitt of Toronto; photography, Ron Fehling, Westside Studio; printing, Data Set and HSP Graphics; film/separations, Passage Productions; type, RoboShop; radio production, Tambre Productions; tv production, Videogenics; and poster space donated by TransAd and Mediacom.

The Toronto-area Crime Stoppers group was started in 1984 and is a cooperative effort of the public, the police and the media.

Stethoscope aids in face-lift

Jeff Layton & Associates’ assignment from its client Hospital Medical Records Institute included giving the 30-year-old company a much needed face-lift.

As well, Layton was charged with getting the hospital-services company’s message out to doctors.

hmri, which is owned by Canadian hospitals, is the only company of its kind in Canada. It provides information to hospitals based on data received from doctors and the hospitals themselves.

This information helps indicate health trends or epidemics, assists the hospitals in gauging what facilities are being used most so they can plan for equipment and staffing, and is a prime source of funding information for governments.

Since the information hmri provides is only as good as the information it takes in, Layton’s goal was to reach the source of the data, the doctors, to explain why hospitals need complete documentation in order to function properly.

Two doctors were enlisted to help write brochures, posters, and a booklet. The creative features one Mr. Stethoscope, an actual stethoscope posed in human attitudes.

As well, a new, friendlier logo was designed for hmri using lower-case letters.

Credits go to Jeff Layton, creative/art director and writer; photography, Rick McKechnie, Westside Studio; Tracy Keenan, copywriter; and Michelle Hirson, computer design and illustration.

Ford breaks the rules

You need to break a few rules when you want to change the public’s perception of a product, and that’s what the Toronto Ford/Mercury Dealers association did with its ‘Take A Look At Us Now’ campaign.

Recently, Young & Rubicam, Toronto, hit the streets for the association armed with a hand-held camera and the question, ‘Want to test drive a Ford, Toronto?’

The resulting tv campaign, consisting of reactions and comments from people on the street, rolled out in three sections: ‘denial,’ ‘semi-acceptance,’ and ‘acceptance.’

The denial stage, which ran for two weeks in early February, wasn’t flattering for the auto maker as Toronto residents turned their backs on a chance to drive new Ford cars.

Next came a two-week semi-acceptance stage wherein people grudgingly admitted that Ford cars looked attractive and that they would drive one, if they had the time, their licence or the ability to drive a car.

The acceptance stage is still on the air. People are happily test-driving Ford cars and making favorable comments about them in the process.

Car models featured to date include the Lincoln Mark VIII, Villager, Explorer, Escort, Taurus and Probe.

y&r bought air time on seven Toronto-area radio stations, using station talent to create the ads and tailoring the message to each audience. The radio spots went through the same three stages from denial to semi-acceptance to acceptance.

Ethnic radio and tv advertising was developed specifically to appeal to the Chinese, Greek, Italian and Portuguese markets.

In English, y&r created eighteen 30-second and five 60-second tv spots, numerous radio spots, and blanketed the city with ‘Take a Look at Us Now’ billboards.