The new professional

Until recently, the last thing that a national advertiser considered when placing advertising in Quebec was choosing an English publication. But, as they say, things change.Outside Quebec, most people do not realize that Montreal remains the third-largest English-speaking market in Canada.Expand...

Until recently, the last thing that a national advertiser considered when placing advertising in Quebec was choosing an English publication. But, as they say, things change.

Outside Quebec, most people do not realize that Montreal remains the third-largest English-speaking market in Canada.

Expand horizons

Within Quebec, most French-Canadian professionals are eager to expand their horizons beyond the province’s borders. This can be attributed to the realities of today’s marketplace.

The new Quebec business person is highly individualistic, fiercely market-oriented, self-confident, and completely bilingual.

Quebec produces more than one-half of Canada’s business school graduates and has six mba programs, more than any other province.

Advantage

Quebec’s business graduates have an advantage over their English-Canadian counterparts. Because they are bilingual, they have access to an even larger piece of the global pie, and are as at home in Paris as they are in New York.

Once considered a barrier to business, French has become a valuable asset in a province that, because of its size, must look to international markets for its products.

Quebec’s business elite is now predominantly francophone, well-educated and speaks impeccable English.

Its members mainly range in age from early 20s to late 40s and have higher-than-average household and personal incomes.

They are true urbanites who are very brand-loyal but are always interested in the newest trends.

They appreciate technological advances, have a strong sense of style, are socially-oriented, dine out frequently and take an active part in the life of the city. They are willing to spend more for quality and service.

This is the market that English magazines and newspapers are responding to.

The Globe and Mail and The Financial Post keep readers informed and up-to-date on national business issues.

NADbank, an annual study of Canadian consumers and daily newspaper readership put out by the Newspaper Marketing Bureau, shows that readership of these publications is determined not according to language, but rather by education, company position, wealth and community stature.

Quebec’s business magazine industry is the one form of media that truly reflects the character of the market.

Homegrown publications such as Les Affaires and pme appeal to a specific market segment. They have quickly grasped the focus of Quebecers: they enjoy reading about themselves.

While providing an abundance of information on local business issues, they sometimes provide limited coverage on national subjects.

As a result, readers refer to ‘source books,’ for example, established English business magazines. Montreal Business Magazine is an example, now in its sixth year of publication.

Montreal Business Magazine, distributed in the Quebec market as an insert to the Globe, is Quebec’s only English business magazine, and continues to grow in size, both editorially and in advertising.

Its primary function is to supply the business community with the most useful and pertinent local and national business information available.

The magazine has established a stable of local business professionals who regularly contribute articles on a variety of important issues that affect Quebec business. The increasing editorial contributions are proof that this magazine is doing something right.

Mark Weller is publisher of Montreal Business Magazine.