Newspapers powerful as ever: Study

A new study from the Newspaper Marketing Bureau says the impact of newspapers and the advertising they carry remains as powerful as ever.The study, the 'Newspaper Advertising Effectiveness Study 1993,' says six key factors influencing advertising awareness were identified.FactorsThey are ad...

A new study from the Newspaper Marketing Bureau says the impact of newspapers and the advertising they carry remains as powerful as ever.

The study, the ‘Newspaper Advertising Effectiveness Study 1993,’ says six key factors influencing advertising awareness were identified.

Factors

They are ad size, reader attitude, use of color, number of visual units in an advertisement, sales approach and page position.

The study found larger ads are noticed by a larger number of readers with a full-page ad 82% more effective than a 1/4-page, a full-page 50% more effective than a 1/2-page and a 1/4-page 12% more effective than a 1/8-page.

The data for the study were collected in 1,618 phone interviews with adults in Calgary, Quebec City, Hamilton and Moncton, n.b. in April-May 1992 and October-November 1992.

Fieldwork and basic cross-tabulations were done by MORI Research in Minneapolis.

Standard Research Systems in Toronto undertook the in-depth analysis of the relationships in gathered data.

The four cities chosen for the study were used to account for the variables of tabloids and broadsheets, English and French, single- and multi-paper markets, regional diversity, large and small markets, stable economy, stable readership and the presence of national advertising.

A total of 592 ads were tested.

Attitude

As for reader attitude, the study found a full-page ad is 28% more effective, on average, among readers in the market for the product or service advertised.

The study says this difference holds true whatever the size of ad measured.

The study found the use of color increases the total awareness of an ad compared with a black and white ad, although the study cautions there were not enough data to analyze the impact of one color versus multi-color.

Also, the study says, an increased number of visual units – headline, phone number, graphic, photograph, etc. – results in a higher reader awareness, and for readers in the market for an advertised product or service a greater number of visual units helps them remember more.

In the market

Categorizing the sales approach to selling merchandise or promoting a brand as non-price/image, price/item, and sales, the study found no matter what the approach, newspaper advertising generates the highest awareness levels among those in the market versus readers as a whole.

For the positioning of an ad on a page, the study reports it does not influence advertising awareness.

There is no statistically significant difference between the left page and the right page, outside and the gutter or the top half or bottom half for all readers or for those in the market. DC