Campaign popularized ferry

New project stresses added capacity after '92 campaignleads to overcrowdingSo successful was its 1992 campaign for BC Ferries that Vancouver-based ad agency Lanyon Phillips Brink now has to address certain problems it created, namely, overcrowding at the Horseshoe Bay terminal.The 1992...

New project stresses added capacity after ’92 campaignleads to overcrowding

So successful was its 1992 campaign for BC Ferries that Vancouver-based ad agency Lanyon Phillips Brink now has to address certain problems it created, namely, overcrowding at the Horseshoe Bay terminal.

The 1992 campaign raised awareness of late night BC Ferries sailings to Vancouver Island from two mainland terminals.

Newsprint

The campaign used newsprint, combined with on-board cards and direct mail with theme schedules showing the new night sailings.

BC Ferries handled the media relations, which publicized the benefits of the late-night sailing times and discounts.

Based on last year’s theme, Lanyon Phillips Brink has launched another newsprint, outdoor and transit campaign under the theme ‘Sale Tonight.’

This time, the ads will promote the larger Tsawwassen Bay terminal as a point of departure, the one best equipped to handle heavy summer ferry traffic, taking a load off the other terminal.

The campaign is led by u.s. transplant Chuck Phillips and former Toronto creative legend Peter Lanyon.

The team has led the agency to gold and silver in several prestigious newspaper print awards competitions for their series of BC Ferries ads (‘We’ve Sliced,’ ‘Lose Wait’ and ‘Back & Forth.’)

Won awards

Last year’s campaign won awards in all the major competitions across Canada, including the B.C. Lotus Awards, the Newspaper Marketing Bureau Extra Awards and a Studio Magazine Award.

Phillips is reluctant to talk about expectations for the campaign after last year’s heady harvest. But signs are already good that the campaign will be as successful.

Before the ink was dry on Lanyon Phillips Brink’s new campaign for BC Ferries, Advertising Age picked up the graphics to run in its ‘Global Gallery.’

Phillips says the new campaign ‘focusses on overnight sailings and added capacity, the same as before. What’s different is that we’ve added a creative personality.’