For the record…

Price Club Canada is holding a two-day consumer show called Price Club Expo in the Automotive Building at Exhibition Place in Toronto.About 400 manufacturers will be on hand Sept. 18-19 to show off more than 2,000 products and services to the...

Price Club Canada is holding a two-day consumer show called Price Club Expo in the Automotive Building at Exhibition Place in Toronto.

About 400 manufacturers will be on hand Sept. 18-19 to show off more than 2,000 products and services to the 15,000-odd consumers expected to attend.

Admission is free to Price Club members, their guests and potentially eligible members.

Price Club debuted the Price Club Expo concept in Canada last April in Montreal.

Price Club says if the Toronto show is as successful as the Montreal show, the organizers will take it on the road to all major centres where it operates retail warehouses.

- Canadian Advertising Rates and Data has published an annual directory that links ownership of Canadian media.

‘Media Cross Ownership Canada’ became available Aug. 9.

It lists all media divisions of a corporation, and is cross-referenced.

Its six sections are a master list of media, alphabetical index of media, media by province, media in Canada’s top 10 markets, business, consumer, farm and ethnic publications, and ultimate owners by region.

- The Telecaster Committee of Canada, the private broadcaster and specialty channel commercial clearance organization, has introduced two new ad clearance guidelines.

The guideline for gambling becomes effective immediately, and the violence guideline becomes effective Sept. 1.

Gambling spots must be accompanied by documentation that states that it is legal in the province where the casino is located, and they should not raise viewers’ hopes by implying if they gamble they will win large sums.

Shots of gaming rooms should focus on the players rather than on money or the games being played. Alcoholic drinks must be shown in glasses only. No brands can be shown and there must be no alcoholic drink consumption.

Also, the advertiser must be clearly identified in audio and video.

For the violence guideline, the Telecaster Committee notes each spot will be judged on its merits. However, as a reference point, the guideline says ads which sanction, glamorize or promote violence will not be accepted.

Spots showing violent scenes which are unsuitable for children will be given post-9 p.m. scheduling, and in some cases post-11 p.m. scheduling. If violent scenes encompass the entire commercial, it may be rejected.

Spots showing scenes of excessive or gratuitous violence or showing graphic scenes of such things as sexual assault will also be subjected to the same scrutiny.

Although commercials may use some aspects of violence for educational purposes, they should not sanction, promote or glamorize violence based on race, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, or mental or physical ability.

Advertisers are further asked to show discretion with the use of graphic language, sexual violence or destruction.

- There’s a new award this year at the Canadian Direct Marketing Association’s RSVP Awards in November in Toronto.

Called the ‘Best of the Best,’ the award acknowledges and promotes the fact that direct marketing is more and more an integrated discipline using a number of media, not just direct mail, says John Gustavson, cdma president and chief executive officer.

The award itself is an original bronze sculpture ‘Winged Victory’ by May Marx.

The winner of the Best of the Best will be a Gold Award winner from one of the categories in which specific results count, excluding the international category winner.