CDMA calls CRTC decision `good move’

The crtc's proposal to ban automatic dialing-announcing devices for certain purposes has received conditional approval from the Canadian Direct Marketing Association.Scott McClellan, communications manager at Toronto-based cdma, says at first glance the proposals appear to be a good move.McClellan says the...

The crtc’s proposal to ban automatic dialing-announcing devices for certain purposes has received conditional approval from the Canadian Direct Marketing Association.

Scott McClellan, communications manager at Toronto-based cdma, says at first glance the proposals appear to be a good move.

McClellan says the cdma’s position is to oppose the use of adads for commercial solicitation, although before the association can make an official statement the proposal by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has to be examined by its Telecommunications Council.

In late September the crtc called for public comment on its proposal to ban adads for such things as soliciting money, advertising for 976 and 900 phone numbers, and fundraising by any organization.

According to crtc Chairman Keith Spicer, the commission has tried to restrict the use of adads to protect consumers, but experience has shown the current rules regulating their use have not been effective in addressing the public’s concerns.

In 1987, complaints to the crtc about adads were less than 3% of all telecommunications complaints.

By 1992, complaints about adads had risen to more than 25% of the complaints the commission received about telecommunications.

Between January and June this year, the commission received almost 5,000 adads complaints.

An adad is automatic equipment that can store or produce phone numbers to be called, and it can be used alone or with other equipment to deliver a pre-recorded or synthesized voice message.

The crtc proposal will still allow adads to be used in an emergency or some other circumstances by fire and police departments, schools, hospitals, and so on.

Business could also use them to notify customers of safety-related product recalls.