Duracell adds fish to popular pool

Duracell Canada is poised to launch the next generation of its long-running 'toy' ad campaign.Building on the success of its robot, ostrich and lizard ads in which Duracell-powered toy characters keep going longer than their competitors, the company is launching a...

Duracell Canada is poised to launch the next generation of its long-running ‘toy’ ad campaign.

Building on the success of its robot, ostrich and lizard ads in which Duracell-powered toy characters keep going longer than their competitors, the company is launching a new spot featuring a school of fish.

The ad, created by Ogilvy & Mather and scheduled to debut Jan. 28, shows fish swaying to the Fats Domino tune, I’m Walkin’.

Natural extension

o&m account director Laurie Young says the new spot represents a natural extension of the popular toy campaign.

‘We’re evolving the toy characters and we expect this commercial will work as well for us as its predecessors,’ Young says.

Joe D’Angelo, brand manager on Eveready batteries, made by Eveready Canada, Duracell’s chief competitor, says consumer demand for batteries is soaring as a result of the explosion in sales of battery-operated toys, video games and other gadgets.

D’Angelo declined to release precise market share information, but he says Duracell and Eveready each have about 40% of the estimated $350-million market.

He says Eveready will continue to air its long-running Energizer Bunny campaign during 1994.

In other news at Duracell, the Toronto-based company is checking out direct-response tv.

Last October, the Toronto-based company ran an experimental direct-response campaign on The Sports Network.

Apparently, it liked what it saw because late in December it launched a pair of direct-response spots on The CTV Television Network and Toronto station cfmt.

Flashlights

The spots are airing in support of a package of four Duracell-brand flashlights: a heavy-duty rubberized light, a waterproof lantern, a portable light and a key-chain flashlight.

The package, which sells for $24.99, includes a $10 coupon for Duracell batteries bought at retail.

Duracell developed the program in a joint venture partnership with Promotions Promotions, a division of Echo Advertising.

Steve Pulver, president of Promotions Promotions, says the program is designed, in large measure, to drive battery sales at the retail level.

Although Pulver is reluctant to reveal financial details of Duracell’s arrangement with the television networks and station, he says the battery maker is paying a commission on the number of units sold.

He says the spots were produced for $30,000.