The Green Giant grows up with sexy Pasta Garden spot

The company that brought us the animated 'Valley of the Jolly Green Giant' and cute characters such as the little Sprout has unleashed a much more sophisticated Green Giant.The new look is featured in a slick 30-second spot for Green Giant's...

The company that brought us the animated ‘Valley of the Jolly Green Giant’ and cute characters such as the little Sprout has unleashed a much more sophisticated Green Giant.

The new look is featured in a slick 30-second spot for Green Giant’s new Pasta Garden product called ‘You’re too sexy for that spud’ that will run throughout the year.

The commercial shows plates of main dishes such as pork chops rotating on a background of traditional side dishes – potatoes, stuffing and rice – to the accompaniment of the dance tune Too Sexy and the lyrics ‘I’m too sexy for that spud, too sexy for that stuffing and the rice. I’m way too sexy for that side dish. Take me to the freezer, Yo, that’s nice. Give me the Garden, New Pasta Garden for me.’

A head shot of the Green Giant appears at the end over a backdrop of Pasta Garden packages and the spot closes to the refrains of his famous ‘Ho, ho, ho.’

Martin Shewchuk, executive vice-president and chief creative officer at Green Giant’s agency, Leo Burnett in Toronto, says the new commercial is a radical departure from past advertising because the company wanted a different approach and something extraordinary for the launch of the product.

Shewchuk says most of the traditional ‘Valley’ advertising comes from Leo Burnett U.S.A., but for Pasta Garden there was a rare opportunity to create a made-in-Canada campaign.

He says while ‘Valley’ advertising will continue, any new Canadian creative will have a different feel.

Others on the Leo Burnett team include Sandy Kedey, art director; Pam Frostad, writer; and Nancy Enderby, agency producer, with production by Derek Van Lint & Associates, Toronto.

Bleu blanc rouge to the bar

communications bleu blanc rouge of Montreal has connected the commercial message to programming content in its first campaign for the Quebec Bar Association.

Eighteen 30-second commercials running over the next few months on tva try to bring lawyers closer to the public and show how they can play a part in everyday life by being part of the solution, not the problem.

The spots are inserted in the first commercial slot after a program and refer to the theme of the on-screen action, divorce, violence, contracts, business, and even sports.

To accomplish this, part of the agency’s negotiations with tva included getting an outline of all scenarios for soap operas and other programming.

The tagline for each spot is, ‘It’s better to consult your lawyer first.’

The tagline for the English newspaper campaign is ‘Get it right first.’