New campaigns Ont. Hydro heads on to TV

Ontario Hydro launched the TV portion of its $3.8-million image campaign last week with three 15-second commercials that bring the theme of the print advertising to life.The same visual scenarios are used - a girl with a large trillium, a girl...

Ontario Hydro launched the TV portion of its $3.8-million image campaign last week with three 15-second commercials that bring the theme of the print advertising to life.

The same visual scenarios are used – a girl with a large trillium, a girl with a globe, and a boy with a watering can – and the ad copy, a direction statement of the utility, has been adapted for voiceover.

Part of the statement is, ‘We believe it’s our responsibility to ensure that a promising, energy-efficient future will be there for all of us and for those who come after.’

The copy goes on to explain that by cutting costs by at least 25%, the cost of electricity will be stabilized.

Ontario Hydro spokesperson Terry Young says the campaign came about because although the public is aware the corporation has gone through a year of unprecedented change, they did not know why or what the effects would be.

Young says the advertising not only gives Ontario Hydro the chance to tell its story about staff layoffs and rate increases, but offers consumers a 1-800 number to call for more information.

The tv spots run 13 weeks, break for the summer and begin a second 13-week flight in the fall.

Magazine, newspaper and bus shelter advertising will continue through to the end of the year.

The campaign was created by Vickers & Benson, Toronto.

Greenpeace switches media

greenpeace Canada had to quickly revise media plans for this month’s advertising campaign in Vancouver and Victoria when BC Transit and the City of Victoria refused to run previously scheduled bus sides and transit shelters.

The cities said the ads were too controversial, although five transit shelters in Vancouver have now been allowed to carry the messages.

Creative originally planned for transit was instead used on 3,000 posters which were posted Vancouver-wide with the help of volunteers.

Three billboards, two in Vancouver and one in Victoria, are now up and full-page newspaper ads have run in The Globe and Mail and Vancouver newspapers.

The advertising focusses on the harmful environmental effects of clearcut logging, specifically in Clayoquot Sound, b.c., which Greenpeace has vehemently protested.

One newspaper ad is headed, ‘They said we’d never run out of cod, either.’ Another says, ’14% of Canadians feel the decision to allow clearcutting in two-thirds of Clayoquot Sound was a good one. 17% think Elvis is still alive.’

Visuals show the swath cut through the area’s forest by loggers.

The posters again use visuals for shock effect. One shows a protester being carried away by police, along with the scene of the clearcut area and the copy, ‘Some get 45 days. Some get life.’

A second, which says, ‘Join the movement to save Clayoquot Sound. (Some restrictions apply.),’ is accompanied by a photo of handcuffs.

The campaign was created by Ranscombe & Co. of Toronto, with credits to James Ranscombe, creative director; Blaine Kennedy, art director; Tony Miller and Andrew Manson, writers.

Tips for the flu

a public education campaign launched last month in London, Ont. by the Ontario Ministry of Health and scheduled to run to mid-March was designed to reduce unnecessary visits to doctors by those with colds or flu.

The campaign, created in partnership with London area doctors, kicked off with a large announcement ad headed, ‘London tests cold program.’

A series of radio and small space newspaper ads use the line, ‘If you take your cold to the doctor, it will last a week; otherwise it will last seven days.’

A booklet entitled, ‘You can’t rush a cold. But you can make yourself feel better,’ was delivered to every London home.

The campaign comes from Ellis Teichman Communications of Toronto, with credits to David Ellis, creative director; Heather Chisvin, writer; Vivian Ducas, art director; and ThinkMusic, radio production.