B&L night vision viewers

Optics company Bausch & Lomb is introducing sneaky scopes for people who want to see what goes bump in the night.There are two models of Night Ranger night vision viewers, a monocular version, which will retail for $1,800 to $2,000, and...

Optics company Bausch & Lomb is introducing sneaky scopes for people who want to see what goes bump in the night.

There are two models of Night Ranger night vision viewers, a monocular version, which will retail for $1,800 to $2,000, and a binocular version for $3,200 to $3,500.

The technology was tested by the u.s. military during nighttime operations in the Gulf War.

The battery-powered viewers convert light to electronic information, which is then amplified thousands of times, allowing users to see with ‘remarkable detail,’ according to the company.

The viewers are being marketed to hunters and anglers, who often have to reach their destinations before dawn, as well as ski patrols, bird watchers, survivalists, and people concerned about home security.

Misuse of the product is not an overriding concern.

‘It’s a legal product,’ says Tim Hurl, marketing manager for Bausch & Lomb, Canada’s Sports Optics division.

‘If people use it illegally, you can’t control it,’ Hurl says. ‘Our direction is that it’s for observation and navigation. People already misuse binoculars and telescopes.’

The viewers will be sold in sporting goods and photo stores, and shops that specialize in astronomy equipment.

Advertising strategies have yet to be determined pending meetings with the u.s. parent company.