Labatt’s Elliot to depart

Bruce Elliot, the man who presided over a number of bold marketing initiatives at Labatt Breweries of Canada, including the decision to market all Labatt labels under an umbrella program, is leaving his post as vice-president of marketing and sales. Elliot...

Bruce Elliot, the man who presided over a number of bold marketing initiatives at Labatt Breweries of Canada, including the decision to market all Labatt labels under an umbrella program, is leaving his post as vice-president of marketing and sales.

Elliot is leaving the job in April to study in an advanced management program at Harvard University.

He is expected to return to Labatt in an as-yet-undefined role – possibly a senior job closer to his previous role in sales and distribution development – after the three-month program.

Taking over the top marketing position as executive vice-president marketing and sales is Paul Cooke, most recently vice-president product supply and distribution with the Hostess Frito-Lay Company in Canada.

A classically trained marketer, Cooke’s credentials include stints as director of marketing for PepsiCo Foods International, based in Dallas, and as a consultant with McKinsey and Company in Toronto.

From 1982-88, Cooke, a native of New Zealand, rose through brand management at Procter & Gamble in Toronto to become associate advertising manager.

Elliot was made vice-president of marketing two years ago after 15 years as a full-time Labatt employee.

Elliot spent more than half his time with Labatt, working exclusively on the sales side.

Before becoming vice-president of national sales, he spent four years as director of sales for Ontario.

Earlier in his career, he held sales positions in New Brunswick and Winnipeg.

Elliot also spent several years in the mid-1980s as a regional brand manager in the Prairies, national brand manager on Budweiser and Bud Light and Ontario marketing manager.

During his two years at the marketing helm, Labatt’s share of the national beer market has increased steadily to its current level of more than 45%.