Enough already!

Wherein Strategy readers flag noteworthy and annoying advertising. Submit yours at: adsthatsuck@strategymag.com or adsthatrock@strategymag.com.

Wherein Strategy readers flag noteworthy and annoying advertising. Submit yours at: adsthatsuck@strategymag.com or adsthatrock@strategymag.com.

Unnecessary repetition

The latest Starchoice campaign, in which the satellite service company criticizes cable companies for charging subscribers for services they do not want, makes the same point again and again and again. Does this make it an effective campaign or just plain irritating? Well, I’m certain that awareness for Starchoice is up, but I would bet that annoyance levels have also increased. Starchoice has driven home its point with me so successfully that I now zap the ad for fear of throwing the TV out the window every time it runs.

Sure, it’s a fact that many cable subscribers do not want/need the many channels included in their cable packages. Point made. Personally, I am sick of seeing that annoying man getting chased out of dark warehouses. Can one of those security guards please arrest the guy and get him off the air!

Here’s my rating:

10 out of 10 for brand awareness

10 out of 10 for annoying

Sandra Evans

Media Researcher

Toronto

Annoying jingle

Every weekday without fail, the same radio commercial runs on Canada AM at 7:20 a.m. It is for a home security company called Alarm Force. The jingle, which is about as creative as beige paint, is perhaps the most annoying piece of music I’ve ever heard – including *NSync. Then the irritating spokesperson, supposedly the president, preaches about how you would buy an Alarm Force system if you really cared about the safety of your family. It sucks big time and it won’t go away!

Greg Jones

Senior Counselor

Cohn & Wolfe PR

Toronto

Counterproductive

messaging

As a supporter of both The War Amps (a Canadian association for amputees) and the Canadian Football League, I hate to criticize their ‘Play Safe’ TV campaign, which has been running for at least a couple of years. But somebody has to point out that the commercials, however well-intentioned, run the risk of being counterproductive.

The spots show kids who have lost limbs through accidents, playing around with CFL players – a dream for many Canadian children and one that only came true for these kids because they didn’t play safe, and as a result, lost a limb.

The resulting unintended message seems to be: Hey kids, do something dangerous like I did, and you too may get to meet football players and star in a commercial.

Bob Knight

President and CD

Knight & Associates

North Vancouver

A complete turn-off

The Imodium ad which features ugly guys sitting in a hot-tub comparing notes on their diarrhea is absolutely annoying – yuk!

Farzana Logan

Principal

Logan Communications

Vancouver