Rogers AT&T Wireless ‘Ringtone’ campaign strikes chord with consumers

Don't feel like talking to mom? Avoiding the ex? Whatever the case, it's probably worth knowing who's at the other end of your ringing cell phone. That's the sentiment Rogers AT&T Wireless was looking to feed into with its recent Ringtones campaign.

Don’t feel like talking to mom? Avoiding the ex? Whatever the case, it’s probably worth knowing who’s at the other end of your ringing cell phone. That’s the sentiment Rogers AT&T Wireless was looking to feed into with its recent Ringtones campaign.

Targeted to youth and young adults, Ringtones is a service that allows customers to download different ring tones/music from the Roger Web site that they can then match with specific phone numbers in order to know who’s calling.

‘It’s a fantastic feature,’ says David Chant, CD at Toronto-based MMI (MacLaren McCann Interactive), which developed the creative for the campaign. ‘You can use it to identify your phone from everyone else’s. No one else I know has my ring – I have Black Sabbath.’

The campaign surrounding the August launch, which is the second-place winner of this year’s Top Ten Interactive Campaigns competition, had a goal of sending qualified traffic to the Rogers e-commerce site (Rogers.com) in an effort to achieve higher conversion rates and a lower cost per acquisition. Ringtones was also designed to compare the effectiveness (ROI) of rich media versus GIF executions and identify which creative messages provide the greatest response.

The campaign consisted of standard GIF (buttons and banners) and five different rich media ads – the objective being to test which message drivers were the key to getting a response to the ad unit. For each message, samples of three songs were provided to test. For example, ‘Boy Message’ focused on the ring tones a girl would use to recognize when her boyfriend was calling – Macho Man, You Sexy Thing, and Insensitive were used.

‘Surfers could actually play the ringtone through the banner ads – they could interact with it and listen to multiple ringtones. And we could track who was listening to what. In theory, we could tweak future rounds or campaigns to include the popular songs,’ says Chant.

A further objective was to obtain a diagnostic psychographic profile of consumers’ ‘purchase’ decision-making process and response to online ad units.

Rogers selected ZEGO’s Campaign Manager (ad serving, tracking and reporting technology from Toronto-based ZAQ) in order to provide the campaign with standard and advanced reporting metrics.

The latter was required to achieve a comprehensive view of the campaign’s effectiveness in achieving sales attributable to the online advertising, as well as obtaining the psychographic data desired for consumer analysis, he says.

Judges’ comments

‘Great creative, visually pure and simple yet very eye-catching. Humorous – we can all relate. This campaign got me excited; I was curious and anxious to see the next creative. Although the case study does not mention it, hopefully they planned a targeted campaign. Otherwise it would defeat the purpose of the creative!’

‘These are simple ads and yet I find them very engaging. Once you’ve played with it, you realize that you’ve just gone through the product demo but you don’t feel you’ve been tricked into it. In fact you look forward to the next execution to see the interaction between product offering and creative. Although they have no results to present at this time, I’m sure that ZAQ is tracking every click and clickthrough, turning all the data into cost per acquisition numbers. I am certain they will be seeing some very strong results.’