Doing digital right

Wireless promos should be as compelling as possible; consumers don't want to pay for generic fare, says Andy Nulman, president of Airborne Entertainment in Montreal. His advice: take a cue from European firms and print short codes on candy bar wrappers and soft drink cans, so shoppers can receive a discount by sending a text message.

Wireless promos should be as compelling as possible; consumers don’t want to pay for generic fare, says Andy Nulman, president of Airborne Entertainment in Montreal. His advice: take a cue from European firms and print short codes on candy bar wrappers and soft drink cans, so shoppers can receive a discount by sending a text message.

Or consider sponsorship opportunities and co-promotions. Airborne, for instance, has an NHL program that delivers up-to-the-minute scores and stats to users. Currently unbranded, ‘it’s crying out’ for logo placements and promotional tiebacks.

When it comes to youth, anything interactive works, says Simon Crowther, managing director of Vancouver-based Alias, a youth marketing consultancy. Here are some ways for marketers to tap in:

* Instant messaging is hot as kids appreciate ’30-way conversations.’ Marketers could customize messages with icons, etc., and somehow seed their product info in a viral fashion.

* Blogging is an up-and-coming avenue for marketers. Nike’s now doing it with its Art of Speed site, featuring short films and a blog. Why? Because it enables them to interact with their audience both informally and instantly.

* 60% of youth (unprompted) think product placement in video games is acceptable, according to Crowther. PricewaterhouseCoopers thinks the worldwide video game industry will reach US$55.6 billion by 2008. Get the picture?