Threeway with…

Scott Goodson spurns the status quo. (Which is probably why he left Canada to start up StrawberryFrog six years ago). He's working to revolutionize the way advertising is made and hiring Richard Monturo, former worldwide director of global strategy at TBWA Worldwide, brings him one step closer.

Scott Goodson spurns the status quo. (Which is probably why he left Canada to start up StrawberryFrog six years ago). He’s working to revolutionize the way advertising is made and hiring Richard Monturo, former worldwide director of global strategy at TBWA Worldwide, brings him one step closer.

‘We feel like we’re the young Turks,’ says Goodson, whose agency was fifth on a recent hot-shop list in AdAge. ‘There are the really tired, huge networks that have been around for 70 years, then you have these very highly respected creative agencies, the Goodbys and Fallons – all from the same period. Our goal for 2005 is to have people recognize we reflect the modern world.’ (At press time, Goodson announced the hire of Andy McKeon, a creative with experience at Goodby Silverstein as ECD in the NYC office.)

Think it’s hyperbole? Monturo, who worked on global accounts like McDonald’s while at TBWA, is a believer. In fact, he sought out Strawberry Frog. Strategy asked what sparked the hook-up, and how they plan to achieve world domination.

What attracted you to StrawberryFrog?

Monturo: All the agencies talk a really good game, about crossing borders, being media neutral – but it’s all words. It became evident StrawberryFrog did exactly what they said they would.

Car accounts are particularly hard to do breakthrough work for, especially when you’re doing a Japanese brand in Europe. Once I saw Mitsubishi, I said: ‘Okay, they know how to do great work and then get it through what can often be really tricky client organizations.’

So, Scott, how do you get it through?

We have intensive sessions where we bring in people from different walks of life. It could be the former global ad director from Nike, but it could also be someone from film or fashion. When clients hear other points of view, in conjunction with their problems, it opens their minds.

How does that transcend into the work?

With a major account, typically you staff up. Mitsubishi U.S. had 150 people. Instead, we have a core team and then outsource. Key responsibilities stay with us – strategic management, client service and creative. [But] we can bring in so many different disciplines. For Pfizer in the U.S. we threw a rock concert in New York City and brought concert promotion people into the team. It’s just a smart way of working.

We start with the consumer. They don’t give a shit that a spot cost $1 million. PR, buzz, guerrilla, viral – all of that to the consumer is advertising.