The sound of windows

It's not often you hear a polar bear crunching through the snow in the middle of Manhattan. Especially not in the heat of summer.

It’s not often you hear a polar bear crunching through the snow in the middle of Manhattan. Especially not in the heat of summer.

The latest campaign from Vancouver-based Canadian Tourism Commission, by DDB Canada, aims to ‘intrigue’ passersby with unique storefront executions that include sound only audible within a couple of metres of the window.

DDB used a technology called ‘Whispering Windows’ from London, U.K.-based tech company Feonic. It works by turning the store window into a large sound radiator, emitting audio at a fixed volume level that’s only loud enough to hear while in front of it.

‘The campaign is about playing up unique experiences in Canada. [Whispering Windows] is a great way to bring the experiences to life,’ explains Andrew Simon, CD at DDB Canada. ‘It’s always on….

As you pass by, for example, you would hear a tundra buggy pulling up, and a polar bear approaching.’

One execution features a photo of a person nose-to-nose with a polar bear, with the tag: ‘Does polar bear breath smell like fish?’ (DDB also did a print version for New York magazine using a scratch-and-sniff patch. Instead of an unpleasant fish aroma, though, DDB opted to give it minty fresh breath.)

NYC-based International Robotics produces a similar audio technology called Hypersonic Sound Beams, which works by projecting sound waves and using the target’s surface as a speaker. So if the target is a person, their head becomes the speaker. Sound waves can be projected from up to 300 feet away.

feonic.com/internationalrobotics.com