Green lights could be greener

Canadians have been taking measures to combat climate change in their personal lives, but as a wise Muppet frog once said, it ain't easy being green. That's the message that World Wildlife Fund Canada is spreading to Canadians through its 2008-2009 climate change campaign.

Canadians have been taking measures to combat climate change in their personal lives, but as a wise Muppet frog once said, it ain’t easy being green. That’s the message that World Wildlife Fund Canada is spreading to Canadians through its 2008-2009 climate change campaign.

WWF’s latest effort, created by Toronto-based Draftfcb, includes a print execution, a television spot shot using only miniatures and an online execution on wwf.ca – and it represents a change in tactics for the not-for-profit organization.

‘This year we’ve done something we haven’t tried before,’ explains Christina Topp, acting VP, marketing and donor relations at WWF Canada. ‘We’re pulling back the curtain on some of the root problems of climate change that still need to be tackled.’

An energy-efficient light bulb is used to tell the underlying story. The TV creative follows the light bulb as it’s manufactured and shipped to a store, showing that though the bulb itself represents a shift towards greener thinking, its manufacture and delivery are by no means environmentally friendly.

‘Green products aren’t as green as you think if they’re manufactured, transported and made like every product,’ says Topp. ‘Until how we make them and power them changes, they’re not as green as they could be.’

The campaign, which launched in January in advance of the United Nations Climate Change Conference taking place in Copenhagen next December, will run until mid-February.

The creds:

advertiser: Christina Topp, World Wildlife Fund Canada

agency: Draftfcb, Toronto

CDs: Robin Heisey, Joe Piccolo, Chris Taciuk

ADs: Joe Piccolo, Oliver Brooks

copywriters: Chris Taciuk, Mike Richardson

agency producer: Kelly Cavanaugh

VP group account director: Jeremy Marten

prodco: OPC, Toronto