Mary Brown’s buys Fat Bastard Burrito

Combining the two restaurant chains will create one of the largest privately held QSRs based in Canada.
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Canada’s QSR landscape is shifting with the announcement that MB International Brands, parent of Mary Brown’s Chicken, is buying Fat Bastard Burrito.

The transaction, which is expected to close on June 30, is going to create one of the largest privately held quick-service restaurant companies based in Canada, combining 215 Mary Brown’s locations and 75 Fat Bastard Burrito locales in Ontario.

Hadi Chahin, president of MB International Brands, says Mary Brown’s and Fat Bastard Burrito are leaders in their respective food segments and that the deal combines two highly complementary franchise networks that will provide more choices for diners as well, as more opportunities for existing and new franchisees of both brands.

This spring, Mary Brown’s announced it would add delivery to its app fulfilled by SkipTheDishes’ white-label SkipGo service, allowing the QSR to keep more customers within its own channels, and also granting customers a way to continue earning loyalty points they had only previously earned through pick-up orders.

Mary Brown’s Chicken, founded in Newfoundland & Labrador about 50 years ago, recently came to market championing Manitoba potato farmers as a way to stand out against global competitors like Popeyes parent Restaurant Brands International, or Yum!’s KFC.

Interest in fried chicken has been strong, as evidenced by the “sandwich wars,” and conglomerates like KFC releasing new offerings.

Fat Bastard Burrito, is a QSR that was founded in Toronto in 2010 and positions itself around “freakin’ huge burritos.”

It competes against the likes of Mucho Burrito, a division of MTY Food Group, which includes brands such as Mr. Sub, Jugo Juice and Cultures, but also Yum! brand Taco Bell.

Another competitor is Mexican-inspired QSR Chipotle, which yesterday announced it has officially launched its loyalty program, Chipotle Rewards, in Canada. The move marks Chipotle’s efforts to make the brand more accessible and to strengthen the relationship with aficionados north of the border.