SkipTheDishes sets out to be more than ‘ordinary’

Jon Hamm returns as a wannabe Canadian in the brand's campaign to build credibility in the crowded meal delivery space.
Skip-the-dishes

Jon Hamm is once again dropping references to Canadiana as a follow-up to SkipTheDishes’ highly successful “Ordinary Canadian Guy” which caused a stir on social and had people questioning whether the actor was Canadian.

In the two latest spots, again featuring Hamm with his assistant and confidante Brandon (played by comedian Monty Geer), the actor rattles off names and locations that are familiar to any Canadian but which would baffle an outsider, such as Moosejaw and Sault Ste Marie.

Kendall Bishop, director of marketing, brand and campaigns at Skip the Dishes, says when SkipTheDishes launched, the company was focused on educating the market about its product, mostly handling marketing in-house. With the launch of the “Ordinary Canadian Guy” campaign last year, handled by agency Arrivals + Departures, she says it made sense to make an investment that would help it build brand credibility. “We don’t know what we don’t know, and we knew it was time to leverage some experts to go along with this large investment,” Bishop adds.

Targeting millennials, who are comfortable with tech and keen on saving time with meal delivery, the company is looking to build that credibility among a wave of competing apps by reinforce its position as the most used one in the country, which is helped by enlisting Hamm.

“People were surprised to see us working with such a high-profile celebrity, which was part of our strategy,” says Bishop.

This year, SkipTheDishes created custom digital content for different channels like Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. The brand also tapped francophone comedian Patrick Groulx for French language collateral for a push into Quebec.

The campaign debuted Sept. 16, with air time during high-profile programming such as the premiere of Survivor, the final season of Modern Family and the finale of Big Brother Canada. True Media handled the media planning and buying, and public relations support was provided by North Strategic.